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Diabetes 101

 So I finally got my meter on Saturday and have been testing my blood first thing in the morning and periodically throughout the day. As I suspecter the Berberine is doing a splendid job with keeping my blood sugar in normal range. There is the small issue of a major spike after I break my fast in the morning. An hour after it is in the 14 mmol range and 8/9 after two hours.

Testing after lunch is a similar story. I am not sure what to do about that but I am researching it as I write this so by the end I should have some ideas on what to do.

What’s a spike, and why do they happen?

After-meal, or “postprandial,” spikes are temporary high blood glucose levels that occur soon after eating. It is normal for the level of glucose in the blood to rise a small amount after eating, even in people who do not have diabetes. However, if the rise is too high, it can affect your quality of life today and contribute to serious health problems down the road.

— Learn More About Blood Glucose Management >>

The reason blood glucose tends to spike after eating in many people with diabetes is a simple matter of timing. In a person who doesn’t have diabetes, eating foods containing carbohydrate causes two important reactions in the pancreas: the immediate release of insulin into the bloodstream, and the release of a hormone called amylin. The insulin starts working almost immediately (to move glucose out of the bloodstream and into cells) and finishes its job in a matter of minutes. The amylin keeps food from reaching the small intestine too quickly (where the nutrients are absorbed into the bloodstream). As a result, the moment blood glucose starts to rise, insulin is there to sweep the incoming glucose into the body’s cells. In most cases, the after-meal blood glucose rise is barely noticeable.

However, in people with diabetes, the situation is like that of a batter with very slow reflexes facing a pitcher who throws 98-mph fastballs: The timing is all fouled up. Rapid-acting insulin that is injected (or infused by a pump) at mealtimes takes approximately 15 minutes to start working, 60–90 minutes to “peak,” or reach maximum effectiveness, and 4 hours or more to finish working. (Afrezza, an ultra-rapid-acting inhalable insulin, begins working within 12–15 minutes of inhaling it, peaks at about 30 minutes, and lasts for about 3 hours.) Meanwhile, amylin is either produced in insufficient amounts or not at all, so the movement of food from the stomach to the intestines is not slowed the way it should be. As a result, food digests even faster than usual. This combination of slower insulin and faster food can cause the blood glucose level to rise quite high soon after eating. Once the mealtime insulin finally kicks in, the high is followed by a sharp drop."

According to the article what I eat has a profound effect on how high the spike goes. Potatoes take it high fast and bean salad with a vinigarette dressing still goes high but not as high and as quickly.

Now I knew some diet management would be needed but it looks like I'm going to pay really close attention to it. Which pisses me off I was hoping it would be easier. than that.


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