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Music: Marching Fun

Definition first I think: Marching refers to the organized, uniformed, steady walking forward in either rhythmic or route-step time; and, typically, it refers to overland movements on foot of military troops and units under field orders. It is a major part of military basic training in most countries and usually involves a system of drill commands. A soldier learning to march to drum cadences, martial music and shouted commands is considered an essential element of teaching military discipline.
Marching is often performed to march music and is typically associated with military and civilian ceremonial parades.
For rhythmic marching, individuals must maintain their dresscoverinterval, and distance (DCID):
  • dress — alignment with the person to the side;
  • cover — alignment with the person in front;
  • interval — space between the person(s) to the side;
  • distance — space between the person in front.

But since I'm thinking of it as a movement sequence for one person I don't think I need to worry about those instead I want to focus on cadence or the rhythmic stepping part of it.

There are several rhythmic military steps or standard paces one can use. Now the usual pace is a 30" step since I'm not sure my legs will stretch that far I will be doing a modified version while still trying to keep the beat. Ok the beats themselves in the military look like this:

  • Quick March: The basic mobility. 120 beats/min. In the US this is called "quick time".
  • Double March: The basic run. 180 beats/min. In the US this is called "double time".
  • Highland March: Regiment-specific pace, 80 beats/min. when wearing kilts.
  • Rifles March: Regiment-specific pace, 140-beats/min. Like double-time, this is a rapid trot, with the rifle usually carried at the trail, not on the shoulder.
  • Slow March: Ceremonial pace, 60 beats/min.
  • Parade March: Usually seen combined with music, 116[2] beats/min. in the UK (except the Rifles who march at 140bpm), ~120 beats/min. in the US and Russia
  • French Foreign Legion Pace: 88 beats/min
  • Paso Legionario: Specific march used by the Spanish Legion, 144 beats/min, embodiment of their "espĂ­ritu de marcha".
  • Typical German speed is 112 bpm.

For mechanical efficiency, opposite arms usually swing with each leg while marching. The distance in front and back that the arm swings also vary but since I'm not planning to go public with my marching I think I will just do the usual 3 inches forward, three inches back maybe working up to six inches who knows.

Ok by now you are probably asking yourself "What is she on about?" 

I said yesterday that I will need to change things up once in a while and this is one way of doing that plus I can do it inside on stormy days which is a definite plus.

Turns out Youtube has a lot of choices when it comes to Marching music so I spent a couple of minutes trying to figure out what I would March to. Still haven't decided but I like these two


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